Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Inspiration

Sorry to be late in posting but yesterday was a day where errands took over and today is a day for some day job related panic. Romantique, the erotic art book Lacy mentioned is one of my faves. It includes a naughty blind man’s bluff scene which was the inspiration for my first erotic historical romance, A Gentleman Seduced. It took months to decide exactly how I wanted to use the scene, up until my hero stepped in and took over. It was marvelous fun to write about my well-endowed viscount who has to choose the courtesan he desires entirely by feel.

I also used Romantique as inspiration for my heroine for my September Aphrodisia, Sin, who draws erotic art. Once upon a time, I used to draw and paint quite a lot, and did scandalize part of my high school art class by drawing male nudes. Now, I find it’s a useful skill, as I can do sketches of my heroes for inspiration. It was a lot of fun to go back to that part of my life and remember what it was like to create in a different media. I wrote the beginning just after my second child was born, and I think the nostalgic sense of touching my past through my heroine made writing Sin very special.

Right now I am writing a heroine who gives her virginity to one man, discovers he is a completely heartless cad, and seduces the hero because she wants to bed the right man—a man she will want to remember. Too risky for regular romance, which is what is so great about erotic romance. I have the chance to explore my characters’ sexual mistakes.

In other news, I may be appearing on t.v. in the fall as part of a national test on the English language. Though I’m a writer, my background is in technical fields like product design and engineering, so I’m a bit intimidated! However, it will be fun, and I've never been on t.v. before--though I was interviewed for the upcoming documentary on romance, "Who's Afraid of a Happy Ending". I'll post more news as I get it.

1 comment:

Jane Lockwood said...

It's interesting how many writers seem to be visual people, inspired by art--their own or other people's--and movies as much as the written word. I wonder if that's because we're in a culture where the boundaries between different media and art forms are becoming blurred--read the book, download the video, IM a friend while you're watching, etc.

It reminds me of the heated debates (and, yes, we can have one here) on whether the Firth/Ehle P&P is superior to the Macfadyen/Knightley version. (For the record I think the M-K one was a beautiful piece of film-making but I appreciated the leisurely pace of the F-E one).
But it's a movie, not a book. It's changed, and we react differently to the big or small screen than we do to the printed page. Have we lost or gained something?